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2013-2-18: Information Station Column

We thought it would be fun to run a series called “Did you know….” To make sure you are aware of many of the things that library can offer you!  Stay tuned for more installments in our series!

Did you know…..

….you can check out art prints to decorate your home or office?  Stop in to see our selection.

….you can have the most recent copies of magazines to read as they are released without ever having to come into the library to check them out?  They come right to your PC or tablet with Zinio – a recent addition on our homepage.

….we offer 6 different storytimes at our library?  Visit our website or call to learn more.

….if you are doing work on your home we have a database to help you with those projects?  Click on the EbscoHost button on our homepage and then open the Home Improvement Reference Center.  You will find videos and helpful links to help you with your home improvements!

….you can get an email everyday telling you when your books are due?  Go to our homepage and click on Library Elf to get signed up.  OR – BRAND NEW – just go into your account and enter an email and/or cell phone number for daily email or texts when you have overdue items.  If you need help setting up a log in for your library account – feel free to give us a call.

Visit the Sioux Center Public Library at www.siouxcenter.lib.ia.us to explore all this and more!

 

Book Review:

A Home is a Roof Over a Pig by Aminta Arrington
I am going to say right off that I am probably biased on this book!  I have two daughters that were born in China and I read anything I can get my hands on that has to do with Chinese culture.  So I was drawn right in with the whole concept of this novel.  The Arrington’s are an American family that decides to leave their Georgia suburb and move to a small town in China to teach.  Aminta leaves, with her husband and three small children, and they plant themselves in China to get all they can out of the culture and, hopefully, give their adopted daughter, Grace, born in China, a part of the culture she lost when the Arrington’s brought her to America as an infant.  Their story is powerful – they share with us so many of the things they learn about the Chinese culture but not from a biased viewpoint – it is honest and thought-provoking and gives the reader a much greater understanding of the culture that is so vastly different from our own.